Category: Oil Free Essential Protection SPF 30


Chamomile Cream by Tu’el is a soothing, healing day and night cream for dry reactive skin. Not artificial fragrances are used to scent Tu’el products, roman chamomile gives this cream a calming and soothing effect.

The Chamomile line of skincare products addresses dry skin: The characteristics of a “true dry skin type” have to do with genetic pore size. You may be water-dry but have plenty of oil.

Dry skin types have small pores with very few large pores that make up less than 1/3 of the face. It could appear flaky around the nose, cheeks, chin and forehead, or have large pores in the nose area.

This skin type can age early. It may be congested and look dehydrated. Dry skin can feel rough because of a buildup of dry skin.

In addition to being dry, the skin type Chamomile Cream addresses is reactive to skincare products and cosmetics. The reaction may be mild to severe and may include swelling, pain, burning, itching or welts. This skin type needs to be treated gently with calming and soothing products.

Intact, healthy skin is your body’s primary defense against infection – so keeping your skin in the best condition possible is really important. Healthy skin is coated in a layer of natural lipids, or fatty substances. This keeps your skin soft and supple. This is where Hy-Drate comes in, it contains sodium hylauronate which binds the moisture found naturally in the skin.

I recommend Hy-Drate to be worn like underwear, before your sunscreen or night cream.

There are a few tips for using moisturizers: 1.) Apply all moisturizers to moist (not wet) skin. 2.) Always apply the thinnest, lightest product first. Hy-Drate is a clear, light, serum-like substance – it ALWAYS goes down first (unless you use toner). Chamomile Cream is thicker so it would follow, and sunscreen last.

What’s in Chamomile Cream?

Purified Water, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Glycerin, Avocado Oil, Hybrid Safflower Oil, Glyceryl
Stearate, Chamomile Extract, Algae Extract, Polysorbate 60,Cetyl Ricinoleate, Shea Butter,
Panthenol (Pro-Vitamin B5), Green Tea Extract, Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E), Retinyl Palmitate
(Vitamin A), Jojoba Oil, Allantoin, Dimethicone, Carbomer, Triethanolamine, Phenoxyethanol, Sorbic
Acid, Disodium EDTA, Roman Chamomile Oil. 2 oz. $41
See you at the spa!

Vitamin Cream by Tu’el is a protective cream for dry skin with Vitamins E, A, and B to lubricate and seal in moisture. No perfumes are used in Tu’el products, but they smell great naturally – Vitamin Cream has a mandarin and mango scent.

Not sure what your skin type is? The characteristics of a “true dry skin type” have to do with genetic pore size. You may be water-dry but have plenty of oil.

Dry skin types have small pores with very few large pores that make up less than 1/3 of the face. It could appear flaky around the nose, cheeks, chin and forehead, or have large pores in the nose area.

This skin type can age early. It may be congested and look dehydrated. Dry skin can feel rough because of a buildup of dry skin.

Intact, healthy skin is your body’s primary defense against infection – so keeping your skin in the best condition possible is really important. Healthy skin is coated in a layer of natural lipids, or fatty substances. This keeps your skin soft and supple. This is where Hy-Drate comes in, it contains sodium hylauronate which binds the moisture found naturally in the skin.

I recommend Hy-Drate to be worn like underwear, before your sunscreen or night cream.

There are a few tips for using moisturizers: 1.) Apply all moisturizers to moist (not wet) skin. 2.) Always apply the thinnest, lightest product first. Hy-Drate is a clear, light, serum-like substance – it ALWAYS goes down first (unless you use toner). Vitamin Cream is thicker so it would follow, and sunscreen last.

What’s in Vitamin Cream?

Purified Water, Caprylic / Capric Triglyceride, Hybrid Safflower Oil, Glycerin, Glyceryl Stearate, PEG-
100 Stearate, Sorbitan Stearate, Mandarin Oil, Apricot Kernel Oil, Carrot Seed Oil, Jojoba Oil, Grape
Seed Oil, Shea Butter, Mango Butter, Polysorbate 60, Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E), Retinyl
Palmitate (Vitamin A), Cholecalciferol (Vitamin D3), Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Panthenol (Provitamin
B5), Sodium Hyaluronate, Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein, Dimethicone, Carbomer, Triethanolamine,
Xanthan Gum, Phenoxyethanol, Sorbic Acid. 2 oz. $41
See you at the spa!

Caring for your skin is a lifetime pursuit, and it’s never too early to start. In honor of  National Skin Care Awareness Month (NSCAM) – I’d like to offer 50% off the Express Facial for your daughters or sons – 18 years old or younger, during the month of September.

Inspired by NSCAM here is Part #1 of a 3 part post about; skincare myths, truths, mistakes and tips to help you care the largest organ of your body – your skin!

COMMON SKIN MYTHS

MYTH #1- SKIN SHOULD FEEL TIGHT AFTER YOU WASH IT. THIS IS A SIGN THAT IT HAS BEEN EFFECTIVELY CLEANED.

TRUTH: Actually, if the skin feels tight after washing, it is a sign that the skin has been stripped of all of its water; this causes surface dead skin cell buildup. Then you have to put your moisturizer on to restore the moisture that you just removed—which makes no sense! Bar soaps (even if they say that they are moisturizing), foaming cleansers, and anything else that leaves your skin feeling tight is an absolute no-no! The most important part of your entire routine is what you wash with. It can make or break the rest of your routine. Look for low foaming cleansers that do not contain the ingredients Sodium Laureth/Lauryl Sulfate or Ammonium Laureth Sulfate, so your skin will have a comfortable and balanced clean. Check out our collection of cleansers.

MYTH #2- CHOCOLATE AND GREASY FOODS MAKES YOUR SKIN BREAKOUT.

TRUTH: There is actually no evidence indicating that these foods increase breakouts. The foods that most often are linked to breakouts are dairy products and citrus foods.

MYTH #3- THE SUN ISN’T AS STRONG IN THE WINTER, SO YOU DON’T NEED SUNSCREEN.

TRUTH: There are two types of rays: UVB rays cause your skin to get a tan or sunburn and they are not as strong in the winter as in the  summer. UVA rays are what cause premature skin aging and skin cancer and they are equally strong from summer to winter so you’re still getting UV damage even on a cloudy, rainy day in December. A UVA/UVB sunscreen needs to be worn 365 days a year, rain or shine, inside or out.

Did you know? 78% of all the sun damage over a lifetime, is from incidental exposure such as driving in your car, in your home or office near windows and simply walking to the mailbox. Yet another reason to wear sunscreen like: Tu’el Oil Free Sun Protector SPF 30.

MYTH #4- OILY SKINS DON’T NEED TO BE MOISTURIZED.

TRUTH: You don’t need extra oil, but your skin still needs water to keep the skin cells healthy and hydrated. When there is no water present, the skin cells die prematurely, resulting in dead skin cell build up, clogged pores and increased oil production. And BTW, drinking water – although great, is not an efficient way to hydrate the skin.

MYTH #5 -YOU CAN SHRINK YOUR PORE SIZE.

TRUTH: Large pores are an indication of how much oil you produced when you were in your teens—the formative years for your pore size. When your skin rapidly pumped out the oil, the walls of the pore stretched wider resulting in larger pores.  Many products will claim to actually shrink your pores, but there is no way to do this, pore size is genetic.

The best way to reduce the appearance of the large pores is by exfoliating often. By using a combination of both physical exfoliants like Tu’el Peeling Cream, and chemical exfoliants like Tu’el Glyco-A Gel on a regular basis, you will help remove surface dry cells so the opening of the pores are not as deep, making them look smaller.

See you at the spa!

It’s a fact: The Ocean is one big sun reflector. You’re more at risk for sunburns and sun damage on the shore than anywhere else.

Here are my expert tips to keep your skin safe this summer:

  • Discontinue use of AHA’s: Using exfoliants regularly (such as Glycolic Acid) have been shown to increase sun sensitivity by 45 percent. It’s best to discontinue use of AHA’s seven days prior to the beach.
  • Sunscreen: It’s not the SPF number that is as important, it is how often and generously you apply.  When it comes to SPF, I prefer SPF 30 reapplied as often as every hour.

My pick: Tu’el Oil Free Protection SPF 30. It’s an oil-free, lightweight full spectrum sun block for oily or impure skin or for those in hot and/or humid climates. 3 oz. $22

It contains a key moisturizing ingredient, Sodium Hyaluronate as well as nourishing Cucumber Extract, Calendula Extract, Chamomile Extract, Green Tea
  • Be aware of oily skinned areas: The areas of your face where you have larger pores will always produce more oils.  These natural oils can breakdown sunscreens more quickly, so pay attention and reapply more often.  For example, the nose area acts as a natural reflectant.  Pay attention to your nose, or any area, that is getting shiny…
  • Apply sunscreen in forgotten areas: hairline, ears, tops of feet, toes, eyelids.
  • Don’t think you are safe in the shade: You still get sun under an umbrella, especially by the ocean. Because the water reflects light you still need to apply and re-apply sunscreen.
  • Wear a hat and sunglasses: If the goal is to help protect your skin from premature aging, a hat and sunglasses can be the extra coverage you need for your face.
  • Got acne? Go for a swim: The salt in the ocean water helps destroy bacteria, which can clear up your breakouts.
  • Rinse off the saltwater: The same water that is destroying bacteria is also very dehydrated (great for blemishes, not for dry skin). Make sure to rinse off before leaving beach.
  • Wear mineral makeup: For extra protection, Youngblood mineral powders has an SPF protecting factor and will give you a finished look without being too heavy for the beach.

What if you applied sunscreen but still got sunburn? The most common problems are:

  • Too little sunscreen applied
  • Not applied every hour for intense exposure
  • Not the right formulation

Sunscreens wear off, sweat off and wash off.  Applying 20 minutes before exposure, liberally and often makes all the difference.  If you want to look young, avoid the sun. A little sun means a little damage; a lot of sun means a lot of damage.

Click here if you want to learn more about sun protection.

Summer means fun at the beach – relax and enjoy but be safe with your skin!

See you at the spa!

Tu’el Oil Free Essential Protection SPF 30

An oil-free, lightweight full spectrum sun block especially for oily or impure skin or for those in hot and/or humid climates. 3 oz. $22

SPF 30 can be worn all day, but is especially important when outside for prolonged periods, or near water.

Some of the ingredients include:

Chamomile Extract: Soothing, calming and  assists in healing.

Green Tea Extract: Powerful antioxidant, free radical scavenger and anti irritant.

Aloe Extract: Soothes and protects.

Sodium Hyaluronate: It is the cosmetic grade of Hyaluronic Acid. Extremely humectant, binds up to 1000 times it’s weight in water, supports collagen and elastin in the dermis where wrinkles form.

People are often confused about sunscreen Sun Protection Factor formulations. Here is what is in this one:
  • Octyl Methoxycinnamate – UVB protection, waterproof, reduces the appearance of scars and is an organic compound.
  • Benzophenone 3 – It is an organic compound, broad spectrum protection photosynthesizing short wave UVA  and absorbs rays in the upper UVB, lower UVB range, where primary sundamage – i.e. burning, skin cancer and aging occur.
  • Octyl Salicylate – Adds emollient properties, is an organic compound and absorbs UVB.
  • Titanium Dioxide – Utra Violet physical block found naturally.
  • Avobenzone – Active, “broad spectrum” (this is an important key phrase, watch for it on labels) protection. It’s an organic sunscreen agent that has the ability to absorb ultraviolet light over a wide range of wavelengths.

See you at the spa!

Aestheticians sometimes call their use of Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHA’s) when doing facials – chemical peels; but they are not peeling the skin, they are resurfacing. Whats the difference? There are 3 levels or strengths of AHAs available:

1. Cosmetic-you can get these at the drug or department store – see The Isles of Beauty

2. Cosmeceuticals-available to licensed skincare specialists.

3. Pharmaceuticals-doctors use these or write a prescription for them.

AHA’s work mainly as  exfoliants. They cause the cells of the skin in the upper layers to become “unglued,” allowing the dead skin cells to slough off and making room for regrowth of new skin deeper down.

AHA’s also stimulate the production of collagen and elastin and improve wrinkling, roughness, and mottled pigmentation or sun damaged skin.

Some examples of AHA’s are: Glycolic – sugarcane, Lactic – sour milk products, Citric – citrus fruits, Malic – apples and pears, Tartaric – grapes.

For home use, I love: Glyco-A Gel by Tu’el

There is also a BHA (beta hydroxy acid) called salicylic. All  the acids have different strengths and purposes. So, what’s the difference between the BHA & AHA’s? Two words: lipid solubility, aka a substance’s ability to dissolve in oil. AHA’s are water soluble, and BHA dissolves in oil. So…oily skin likes BHA and normal to dry skin like AHA’s.

Try: 5% Salicylic Acid Clarifying Pads by DermaQuest Skin Therapy.

Side Effects of these acids include; irritation, sun sensitivity, redness, and itching.

Rosacea is a skin disease that responds favorably to some forms of resurfacing, but because this condition is often red, irritable and swollen,a patch test on the inside of the arm to check for allergic response or sensitivity is recommended. The capillary walls are near the surface of the skin in this condition (hence the redness and veiny appearance) so the skin needs extra protection. The skin is also thin, so toughening it up and thickening it with AHAs can be helpful.

AHA & BHA products may reverse some of the damage caused by the sun, but at the same time they make the skin more susceptible to sun damage. When using resurfacers use a good sunscreen – see Sunscreen 101 , that contains UVA and UVB protection.

My favorite: Oil Free Essential Protection SPF 30 by Tu’el

See you at the spa!

Getting great skin is like raising a child; you need equal doses of discipline and TLC.

For skin, discipline means exfoliation. This is important because your skin is constantly shedding dead layers and building new cells deep in the dermal layer. The older you get, the slower this regenerative process becomes. There are three types of exfoliation that you can do at home, and professionally as well:

1.) Massage – Unless your skin is acne prone or very sensitive, massaging with the products you use to “nurture” your skin (think moisturizers, serums and Cleansing Oils!), is a form of exfoliation.

The proper technique for facial massage is as follows:

Forehead… Begin in the middle of the forehead making small circular movements out towards the temples. Repeat 5 times.

Eyes… From your temples, glide your index fingers over your brow and circle your eye sockets. The pressure should be very light. Repeat twice.

Nose… Slide your fingers down each side of your nose to the tip and up again. Repeat 5 times. End at the top of the mouth.

Mouth… Use your index and middle fingers and start at the chin, gently massage in a circular and upward motion around the mouth and lips. Bring the massage motion to the top of the mouth, under the nostrils. Repeat 5 times.

Cheeks… In a circular motion, massage outward from your chin to your earlobes, from the corners of your mouth to the middle of your ears and from your nostrils to your temples. Repeat twice, covering the whole area of the cheek.

Chin… Begin on your right where the jaw meets your ear. Using your thumb and index finger, gently slide across the jaw to your chin. Massage back to the starting point with circular motions. Repeat on the left side. Repeat 3 times each side.

Neck… Beginning at the back of the neck, massage upwards to the head with small circular motions. Repeat 5 times. Come around to the front of the neck and gently stroke upwards from the collarbone to the base of the chin. Repeat 3 times.

2.) Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHAs) –

AHAs have been used for thousands of years, Cleopatra was said to have bathed in sour milk (lactic acid) to improve her skin tone.

They are typically derived from food products. Don’t let the word acid throw you off.  They are classified scientifically as acids, because of their ability to penetrate the skin. They dissolve the “glue” that holds the superficial layers of the skin together.

You’ll find AHAs in the Isles of Beauty, in skincare clinics or prescribed by doctors in the form of moisturizers, cleansers, serums and masks. You can use them at home or have professional treatments.

I like Tu’els Glyco-A Gel and Crystal C Serum; they have multiple AHA’s to exfoliate, brighten, strengthen, as well as calm the complexion.

3. Scrubs – This family of exfoliants clean up dead skin cells on the skin’s surface. I like Tu’el Peeling Cream a manual microdermabrasion product. Be careful with this family of products though; use sparingly and massage lightly – more is not better.

Exfoliation can be done up to 5 times per week, or until the skin manifests the desired effects. Use different forms of exfoliation, give your skin “time off” and don’t use the same products for prolonged periods – results diminish.

All exfoliants stimulate new cell growth deep in the skin, but they also create free radicals and break the skin down.

A word of caution – don’t use resurfacers or get peels unless you are willing to use an appropriate sunscreen religiously,as well as a nurturing regime to combat the challenges resurfacing presents to the skin.

Most of this post is applicable for “normal skin”. People with clinical grade acne, history of melanoma, extreme sensitivity, any skin disease like rosacea, or those who are under the care of a physician should consult a professional and proceed with caution.

Moisturizers, antioxidant serums, soothing masks, and peptides are a few of the nurturing products that are necessary when you are serious about caring for your skin.

Get a plan for loving the skin your in.

See you at the spa!

 

%d bloggers like this: